Would you buy house with a cracked pad but roof truss is okay?

Credit and mortgage advice Forums Buying Your Home Would you buy house with a cracked pad but roof truss is okay?

This topic contains 15 replies, has 15 voices, and was last updated by  Anonymous 7 years, 5 months ago.



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  • #206899

    Anonymous

    Great 3 bedroom ranch, attached garage, backs up to woods, quiet neighborhood. House is $20 – $40,000 LESS than others in the neighborhood. Interior rooms in back portion of house have gone off plumb 1″ – 2″. I’m close to 50, not a do-it-yourselfer… can I just live in it and if I hit the lottery, build a basement under it?



  • #261015

    Anonymous

    i AM ado it yourselfer and have built a couple of homes. NO. i would not consider it. there is too much to make it worthwhile. money is better spent on one with a basement, and solid. listen to these answers.

  • #263566

    Anonymous

    Have it checked out first by someone who knows foundations.

  • #265645

    Anonymous

    no i need a quality home

  • #267345

    Anonymous

    no idea what a cracked pad is, so we in england dont have that, only a crack pad i think thats a drug house?

  • #267794

    Anonymous

    I’m assuming the house is on a slab? In that case, it would be a MAJOR undertaking to “build a basement under it” – you’d have to either jack up the existing house and remove the current slab or actually move the house onto a new foundation. Either option requires you to move out during the renovation.

    I’d pass. There’s a possibility that the cracked slab will continue to settle causing the house to go further out of kilter. That can crack walls, put doors and windows out of square, crack tiles, all kinds of mess.

    And, as someone who lives in a house on a slab, I REALLY wish we had a basement or at least a crawl space.

  • #269682

    Anonymous

    Things like this get worse. I guess the question is will you feel any more like dealing with problems in 10 or 15 years. i suspect not, if you’re at all like I am.

    I’d say avoid.

  • #271857

    Anonymous

    Cracked pad? I would not purchase a home with a slab type foundation (all concrete floors), and certainly not if foundation is not level. Foundation problems are very expensive and invasive to the home to repair

  • #274169

    Anonymous

    I wouldn’t take it. As a general rule…if the foundation is solid, everything else can be fixed. If the foundation is weak and the rest is in good shape…then you have everything you’ve worked for, sort of balancing on the edge of a cliff. If the foundation sinks…so does everything else.

  • #274953

    Anonymous

    1-2″ off plumb, no it will only get worse. Get an estimate on foundation repair, that’s probably why the price has been reduced.

  • #277695

    Anonymous

    Cracked foundation is no small matter to fix, it can be very expensive, I would call a reliable home inspector and get his/her opinion on the need/cost/consequences of the problem.

  • #277891

    Anonymous

    Repairing a cracked/broken foundation can be very expensive – that’s most likely why the price is so low. Also, a finance company may not loan money to purchase the house. Have a contractor look at the house, or a really good building inspector and get their opinion and cost estimates. The other big question is what caused the problem – is the house in an area with known ‘sink holes’ or other similar problems?
    Don’t forget, that it the problem becomes acute, the local government may condemn the house and make you repair it or move.
    It is possible to lift a house and install a new or repair an old foundation, still big $$$.
    Base on what you’ve said, I’d look elsewhere.

  • #277990

    Anonymous

    Repairing a cracked/broken foundation can be very expensive – that’s most likely why the price is so low. Also, a finance company may not loan money to purchase the house. Have a contractor look at the house, or a really good building inspector and get their opinion and cost estimates. The other big question is what caused the problem – is the house in an area with known ‘sink holes’ or other similar problems?
    Don’t forget, that it the problem becomes acute, the local government may condemn the house and make you repair it or move.
    It is possible to lift a house and install a new or repair an old foundation, still big $$$.
    Base on what you’ve said, I’d look elsewhere.

  • #279672

    Anonymous

    I would ask for an inspection to find out if there is a geological reason for it to be off. Is it in a slide area? And I would get an estimate for the repairs to see how much it would cost to fix it.

  • #282617

    Anonymous

    there is an answer why this is happening, find out first before you invest your hard earned money…

  • #435440

    Anonymous

    As credit scores have become the predominant decision making tool in the mortgage industry, I have not run across any of these companys. You are corrIect that the norm now is the middle of three or the lower of two. The country is broken up into regions where one of the three bureaus would be the predominantly used by creditors in that area. Daily I see bureaus where the low score could be in the 500’s and the high in the 600’s, over a 100 point difference. The mid-score gives a better picture of the credit worthiness of a potential borrower.

    Your best bet would be to contact several brokers in your area and ask them if they have any lenders that use only the TU score.

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